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20121201
20121231
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KQEH (PBS) 38
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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. sometimes we can see the universe in a grain of sand, as the old saying goes, but nowadays a graphic chart more viv
that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working conditions in bangladesh, where more than 100 workers have died over the past month. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama made another foray outside washington today, trying to build public support for a fiscal cliff agreemen
, if the economy picks up sharply, riskier assets could become more attractive. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: more signs today that housing demand is picking up: the number of contracts signed to buy homes rose in november, to its best level in more than two years. the national association of realtors index of pending sales rose almost 10% last month. so will the housing market continue to recover in the new year? that's what tom hudson asked toll brothers chief financial officer marty connor. >> the housing market willcontig as done consumer confidence maintains or improfls. and a lot of that will be contingent on resolution of the fiscal cliff and the government and the economy. >> a lot of ways to measure thet but the most direct way for momentum home buyers and sellers is prices. do you expect that trajectory to continue? >> i do.we have raised prices ia little more than half of our communities. it's been relatively modest. but as we observe and we read stats, we are getting a lit lite more confident and may push prices a bit more in 2013. >> what are you finding in termg mater
.com and former detroit bureau chief for the "new york times," and by bill ballenger, editor of "inside michigan politics." welcome to you both. mickey maynard. first, this has all happened very quickly. what precipitated this right now. >> there were two things that happened, judy. first of all in november there was a ballot proposal that unions floated that would have outlawed right-to-work. it would have put that into the state constitution. that proposal failed because it was proposed at the same time as a lot of constitutional amendments. people just sort of cast one vote against all of them. the second thing that happened was republicans gave up some seats in the house and senate. it will still be a republican majority in january but it will be smaller. if right-to-work was going to happen this lame duck republican-controlled legislature was where it was going to happen. >> woodruff: bill, in a state that voted by ten points for president obama in november, it's a state that is striking a blow for right-to-work. how do you explain that? >> there was a mixeded result on november 6. i think
corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the coalberg foundation, independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation. the clements foundation, park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alfred foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audrey rappaport foundation. and the betsey fink foundation. barbara g. fleischmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing group, individual, and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. the bells rang for the lost. charlotte bacon, olivia engle, anna marquez green, catherine hubbard, emilie parker, jack pinto, noah posner, jessica ricos, benjamin wheeler, and allison wyatt. all were 6 years old. daniel barden and grace mcdonald were 7. six adults died with them. mary sherlock, dawn hochsprung, victoria soto. it helps to say their names to rescue them from the statistical anonym
. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a gunman at a school, mass casualties, and emergency crews-- the scene was eerily familiar and, once again, horrifying. this time, tragedy struck at a grade school in a small connecticut town. 20 of the 27 dead are children. we begin our coverage with president obama's emotional address to the nation this afternoon. >> we've endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. and each time i learn the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those
firefighters in rochester, new york and a policeman and bystander in houston, texas. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the killings, coming ten days after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. >> brown: then, we turn to egypt, and accusations of voting fraud in the referendum for a new constitution. we talk with opposition leader mohamed el-baradei. consider a sad day in my view for it is going to institutionalize -- >> ifill: the legal showdown between california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned chi
corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arrive ted white house this afternoon for their first group meeting with the president since november 16th. vice president biden and treasury secretary timothy geithner also attend. but there was little to suggest the makings of an 11th hour bargain. a source familiar with the meeting told the newshour its president is sticking with his offer from last friday. it included keeping the bush era tax break force the middl
that russia's position on syria may be changing. the "new york times" reports that the russians had agreed to a new strategy to persuade president assad to step down. for more on all of this, we turn to dimitri simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't kno
: police in webster, new york, found human remains today in the burned-out home where a gunman ambushed firefighters on christmas eve. the victim appeared to be william spengler's sister. he left a note saying he wanted to burn down the neighborhood and kill people. spengler set fire to his house, then shot four firefighters-- killing two-- before killing himself. he had a revolver, a shotgun, and a bushmaster rifle, the same model used in the newtown school shooting. >> i can't tell you at this time what the victims were shot with. we assume it was the rifle because of the distance. it's going to go to the medical examiner. they'll have the autopsies done. >> holman: two firefighters remained hospitalized today in stable condition. the fire spengler set ultimately burned seven homes. the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warn
: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, traveled to norfolk recently to look at how it has been struggling with flooding and preparing for the next big storm. he worked with member station whro to bring us this report. it's part of our series-- working with public media partners across the country-- that we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when r
columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. so david, where are we on this cliff, over, under, sideways. >> we're going backwards. i guess that is a good thing. >> backing away would be good. >> we're going towards the cliff. >> and so what happened is the election happened. obama wins. clearly he ran on raising tax or raising revenue from the top 2%. center piece. republicans are not stupid. they sort of understand that. so they went through a process the day after boehner said revenues but not rates, and some began to drift over, okay, rates, so you have had movement, until friday or yesterday, thursday, when tim geithner goes up there and delivers an ultimatum which is a chest thumping stick in the eye to the republicans. and all the migration suddenly stops and suddenly they get outraged apt are. and so they are back, they are going back to where grover norquist wants them to be because they are outraged because they feel they have been insulted is, that this is not a negotiation t a war. i think what had yesterday from the administration was a bit of negotiat
that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy carnegie.org. op >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions an foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioni sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org ed
dismissed the focus on rice's remarks. gary ackerman of new york said congress has become a partisan bickering bunch of grousing old people. >> trying to quibble around here on this particular issue of the narrative rather than how we work together to make things better to quibble over somebody said a particular word or didn't use the right word, rather than figure out how to avoid the mistakes that might have been to not lose american lives on into the future. >> reporter: amid the furor, ambassador rice has withdrawn herself for consideration as secretary of state. and four state department security officials resigned on wednesday. >> suarez: retailers are hoping to finish the holiday shopping season strong, particularly given some forecasts warning of a slowing economy in 2013. as we reported earlier, consumer spending helped spike better growth this fall. but in light of the last recession, some are asking whether less personal debt and perhaps some more austerity might be a better approach. "newshour" economics correspondent paul solman has been exploring that question. part of
: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominated massachusetts senator john kerry to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdrew her name. she'd faced republican criticisms over the benghazi terrorist attack. president obama made the announcement this afternoon at the white house. >> i am very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role. havi
.. >> on my way to work this morning, i saw the tree by the new york stock exchange, and it looks pretty impressive. >> tom: we saw you putting ornaments on it. but the trees are tweeting? is that right? >> susie: not quite right, and those trees are a little too high for me to reach to put an ornament. that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, december 4. have a great evening, everyone, and you, too, tom. >> tom: good night, susie. we'll see you online at nbr.com, and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
of pennsylvania, upstate new york and new hampshire. in some places, snow brought road travel to a standstill. at the same time, operations at major airports improved, with far fewer delays than earlier this week. in india, the embattled prime minister remained under pressure to take action against sexual assaults after a gang rape this month triggered violent protests. manmohan singh promised a thorough review of india's rape laws and efforts to expedite trials. meanwhile, police moved to quell a rally by about 500 students protesting the treatment of women as they moved toward a monument in new delhi. the students complained officials had declared the site off limits. >> ( translated ): we are taking out this peaceful protest. we don't have any conflict with the police. we have just come here to express our stand. all the students are expressing their opinions here as you can see so the police should allow all of us to pass through to the place. this is only our demand and nothing else. >> holman: the rape that ignited the protests was that of a 23- year-old woman attacked by six men, then
could be wrong. >> reporter: whatever the genetic recipe is, "new york times" media reporter and columnist david carr is certain it is wired into his d.n.a. did you come close to dying? >> yeah, quite a few times. >> reporter: carr has been clean and sober for 20 years now, but nearly lost everything after years of drug and alcohol addiction, all of it chronicled in his lyrical 2008 memoir the night of the gun. so you think there's probably some genes inside you that make you want this more than others? >> since i've been three or four years old, i would spin around until i got dizzy and then fall down. i think the desire to feel different than i feel right at this moment and see how pretty much baked in me. >> reporter: which brings us back to dr. schuckit's scientific saloon. >> the tests i take under the influence will determine how sensitive i am to alcohol. >> reporter: he designed the regime for a long-term study of 450 men. it's been underway for 30 years now. schuckit found those who get tipsy easily are about three times less likely to become alcoholics, but those wh
. it shatters them. >> suarez: outside washington there were other calls to curb gun violence. new york city mayor michael bloomberg joined survivors and victims' relatives demanding action. >> last night the president said he would use whatever powers his office holds to address this violence. i think it is critical that he do so. words alone cannot heal our nation. only action can do that. gun violence is a national epidemic and a national tragedy that demands more than words. >> suarez: the mayor urged congress to reinstate a ban on assault-style weapons like the bushmaster a.r.15 rifle that adam lanza used friday. versions of that gun were outlawed in 1994 but the ban expired in 2004. a new poll out today from abc and the "washington post" found 54% of americans support stricter gun laws in general. still 71% oppose banning the sale of handguns. and in addition to gun control, there are new appeals to identify and help treat potentially troubled individuals before there's a tragedy. connecticut governor dan maloy spoke this afternoon in hartford. >> are we doing enough from a meantal hea
that passes and changes the public opinion of gun ownership? >> if we can ban super sized soda in new york city, i think we can do this. >> i do have a cynicism in me that says, you know, if we lose momentum we're going to be footnoted to the next horrible tragedy that unfolds. a month from now, two months from now. i hate that feeling. it's really cynical and a horrible thing to think. but it seems like that's sort of been the pattern over the last several years. >> i support responsible gun ownership. i've gone to firing ranges. i've fired guns. i don't own a gun. i would be happy to listen to responsible gun owners as well. i don't support banning all guns. just weapons that can just keech shooting and shooting and shooting. >> and i feel the same way. i grew up learning to shoot with my father. it's one of the few things we did together. >> the fact is we need to start enforcing laws we have. we need to make stronger laws. particularly regarding these high-powered weapons. that are brutally efficient at killing people. because there's no need for civilians to have those. i don't think
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)